What we test

Homocysteine

Elevated homocysteine blood test levels are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and may also be elevated in cases of malnutrition or vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.

This homocysteine blood test measures:

An amino acid normally present in very small amounts in all cells of the body. Homocysteine is a product of methionine metabolism - one of the 11 ‘essential’ amino acids that must be derived from the diet.

Coagulation Profile

While fibrinogen levels are elevated, they may increase the risk of developing a blood clot and over time this can contribute to an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

This blood test measures:

While fibrinogen levels are elevated, they may increase the risk of developing a blood clot and over time this can contribute to an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

Inflammation

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a protein made by the liver and secreted into the blood. It is often the first evidence of inflammation or an infection in the body. Its concentration increases in the blood within a few hours after the start of infection or other inflammatory injury.

This blood test measures:

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a protein that increases due to inflammation. There is growing evidence that atherosclerosis (fatty build-up in artery walls) is an inflammatory process, however this type of inflammation produces only small amounts of CRP. Therefore this test is known as high-sensitivity CRP or hs-CRP.

Cholesterol

Lipids and cholesterol are fat-like substances in your blood. Some are necessary for good health, but when you have a high level of cholesterol in your blood, a lot of it ends up being deposited in the walls of your arteries and other vital organs. Lifestyle choices including diet, exercise and alcohol intake can all influence cholesterol levels and your risk of developing heart disease.

This cholesterol test measures:

High total cholesterol is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol is often called ‘bad cholesterol’ because it contributes to plaque, a thick, hard deposit that can clog arteries and make them less flexible.

HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol is often called ‘good cholesterol’ and is protective against atherosclerosis.

The main storage form of fatty acids in the body. Elevated triglyceride levels may contribute to hardening of the arteries, and increase the risk of heart disease or stroke.

Non-HDL cholesterol is considered an effective lipid measurement for assessing cardiovascular disease risk as it is believed to reflect levels of 'bad' cholesterol. Other risk factors include smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, age, gender, ethnicity and family history.

Lipoproteins

High levels of Lp(a) increase your risk of atherosclerosis and is an inherited genetic condition. The apo B/apo A-I ratio indicates the cholesterol balance between potentially atherogenic (bad) and anti-atherogenic (good) particles.

This blood test measures:

Apo A is a protein carried in HDL ("good") cholesterol. It helps start the process for HDL to remove bad types of cholesterol from your body. In this way, apolipoprotein A can help to lower your risk for cardiovascular disease.

Apo B containing lipoproteins are the ones most likely to enter the wall of the arteries. They are capable of trafficking cholesterol into the artery wall, and if present in increased numbers may be the main initiating factor in atherosclerosis.

The apo B/apo A-I ratio indicates the cholesterol balance between potentially atherogenic (bad) and antiatherogenic (good) particles. The ratio is strongly related to risk of cardiovascular disease.

High levels of Lp(a) increase your risk of atherosclerosis and is an inherited genetic condition. As levels are genetically determined they are usually not lowered by lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise. Your level of Lp(a) remains virtually constant throughout your life.

Blood Glucose

Blood glucose is generated from carbohydrates and to use this fuel for energy your body needs insulin. With type 2 diabetes the cells either ignore the insulin or the body doesn't produce enough of it. Glucose then builds up leading to problems with the heart, kidneys, eyes, nerves, and blood vessels.

This blood test measures:

If you have diabetes your body doesn't process glucose effectively.

Test instructions

Fast from all food and drink other than water for at least 8 hours, and no more than 12 hours prior to your test.

Print out the pathology form that we email you.

Take your form to your local collection centre to have your sample taken - no need for an appointment.

Results for this test available in 1-2 weeks and will be published in your online dashboard.

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